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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 167--172

Professional quality of life among professional care providers at cancer palliative care centers in Bengaluru, India

Amanpreet Kaur1, Mahendra P Sharma1, Santosh K Chaturvedi2 
1 Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Ms. Amanpreet Kaur
Department of Clinical Psychology, 3rd Floor, M.V. Govindswamy Building, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Hosur Road, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India

Context: Being a professional care provider at cancer palliative care settings is demanding and stressful. Literature has indicated the prevalence of high burnout (BO) and distress; however, there is a dearth of studies in India, with no study available on professional quality of life in the field of palliative care. Aims: The aim of the present study was to explore the professional quality of life, namely-compassion satisfaction [CS], burnout [BO], and secondary traumatic stress [STS] among professional care providers at cancer palliative care centers. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional, descriptive, and quantitative study was carried out at four cancer palliative care centers in Bengaluru after the permissions and ethical approvals. Subjects and Methods: The tools used were brief sociodemographic datasheet and professional quality of life (ProQoL)-Version 5 administered with 65 participants (mean age = 32.5 and standard deviation = 11.78) with work experience of at least 6 months. Analysis: A descriptive, correlational, and inferential analysis of the quantitative data was undertaken. Results: The results revealed that an average level of CS and BO was reported by 32 (49.2%) and 35 (53.8%) study participants, respectively, while 62 (95.4%) participants reported higher STS on ProQoL scale-Version 5. Significant differences in levels of CS, BO, and STS were found based on additional training taken in palliative care (P = 0.01), designation type (P < 0.001), and workplace type (P = 0.01). Conclusion: The overall results strongly suggest that a short intervention targeting STS and BO can help the study population and further enhance their CS and patient care.


How to cite this article:
Kaur A, Sharma MP, Chaturvedi SK. Professional quality of life among professional care providers at cancer palliative care centers in Bengaluru, India.Indian J Palliat Care 2018;24:167-172


How to cite this URL:
Kaur A, Sharma MP, Chaturvedi SK. Professional quality of life among professional care providers at cancer palliative care centers in Bengaluru, India. Indian J Palliat Care [serial online] 2018 [cited 2021 Jan 20 ];24:167-172
Available from: https://www.jpalliativecare.com/article.asp?issn=0973-1075;year=2018;volume=24;issue=2;spage=167;epage=172;aulast=Kaur;type=0