Indian J Palliat Care Home 
 

REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 39--41

Spirituality and palliative care

Bert Broeckaert 
 Interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Religion and Worldview, K.U. Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Correspondence Address:
Bert Broeckaert
Interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Religion and Worldview, K.U. Leuven, Leuven
Belgium

This paper shows how palliative care developed as a reaction to the compartimentalized technical approach of modern medicine. But what does it mean if we say palliative care wants to treat patients as whole persons? A few pitfalls need to avoided. All disciplines involved in palliative care should act within the limits of their own specific professional role. Physicians and nurses should certainly not force patients into spiritual or religious discussions or practices. They should understand that religion and spirituality also influence the ethical (and thus medical) choices people make, respect their own conscience and worldview too and cultivate conscious compassion.


How to cite this article:
Broeckaert B. Spirituality and palliative care.Indian J Palliat Care 2011;17:39-41


How to cite this URL:
Broeckaert B. Spirituality and palliative care. Indian J Palliat Care [serial online] 2011 [cited 2021 Jun 13 ];17:39-41
Available from: https://www.jpalliativecare.com/article.asp?issn=0973-1075;year=2011;volume=17;issue=4;spage=39;epage=41;aulast=Broeckaert;type=0