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Year : 2008  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 23--29

Adverse psychosocial consequences: Compassion fatigue, burnout and vicarious traumatization: Are nurses who provide palliative and hematological cancer care vulnerable?

Brenda M Sabo 
 Dalhousie University School of Nursing, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Brenda M Sabo
5869 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3H 3J5
Canada

The work environment significantly affects the physical, psychological, emotional and/or spiritual wellbeing of individuals is unquestionable. Adverse effects have been noted among healthcare professionals working with clients experiencing pain and suffering often associated with cancer, palliative or end-of-life care; however, little is known about how or in which manner the nurse-patient-family relationship may affect the psychosocial health and wellbeing of nurses working in these areas. Three concepts have been highlighted as most frequently associated with the adverse consequences of caring work: these are compassion fatigue (secondary traumatic stress), burnout and vicarious traumatization. The following discussion investigates these concepts and their implications on palliative and hematological cancer nursing practice.


How to cite this article:
Sabo BM. Adverse psychosocial consequences: Compassion fatigue, burnout and vicarious traumatization: Are nurses who provide palliative and hematological cancer care vulnerable?.Indian J Palliat Care 2008;14:23-29


How to cite this URL:
Sabo BM. Adverse psychosocial consequences: Compassion fatigue, burnout and vicarious traumatization: Are nurses who provide palliative and hematological cancer care vulnerable?. Indian J Palliat Care [serial online] 2008 [cited 2021 Apr 14 ];14:23-29
Available from: https://www.jpalliativecare.com/article.asp?issn=0973-1075;year=2008;volume=14;issue=1;spage=23;epage=29;aulast=Sabo;type=0