Indian Journal of Palliative Care
Open access journal 
  Print this page Email this page   Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Users online: 270  
     Home | About | Feedback | Login 
  Current Issue Back Issues Editorial Board Authors and Reviewers How to Subscribe Advertise with us Contact Us Analgesic Prescription  
  Navigate Here 
 »   Next article
 »   Previous article
 »   Table of Contents

 Resource Links
 »   Similar in PUBMED
 »  Search Pubmed for
 »  Search in Google Scholar for
 »Related articles
 »   Citation Manager
 »   Access Statistics
 »   Reader Comments
 »   Email Alert *
 »   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7932    
    Printed130    
    Emailed8    
    PDF Downloaded405    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 

 POSITION PAPER
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 171--181

End of life care policy for the dying: Consensus position statement of indian association of palliative care


1 Palliative Medicine Consultant, National Coordinator, Palliative Care Program of Christian Medical Association of India, India
2 Associate Editor, Consultant, Department of Palliative Medicine, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
3 Medical Director, Cipla Palliative Care and Training Centre, Pune, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Palliative Medicine, Bhagwan Mahaveer Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
5 Palliative Medicine Specialist, Cipla Palliative Care and Training Centre, Pune, Maharashtra, India
6 Medical Director, Karunashraya Hospice, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Naveen Salins
Associate Editor, Consultant, Department of Palliative Medicine, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.138384

Rights and Permissions

Purpose: To develop an End of Life Care (EOLC) Policy for patients who are dying with an advanced life limiting illness. To improve the quality of care of the dying by limiting unnecessary therapeutic medical interventions, providing access to trained palliative care providers, ensuring availability of essential medications for pain and symptom control and improving awareness of EOLC issues through education initiatives. Evidence: A review of Country reports, observational studies and key surveys demonstrates that EOLC in India is delivered ineffectively, with a majority of the Indian population dying with no access to palliative care at end of life and essential medications for pain and symptom control. Limited awareness of EOLC among public and health care providers, lack of EOLC education, absent EOLC policy and ambiguous legal standpoint are some of the major barriers in effective EOLC delivery. Recommendations: Access to receive good palliative and EOLC is a human right. All patients are entitled to a dignified death.
  • Government of India (GOI) to take urgent steps towards a legislation supporting good EOLC, and all hospitals and health care institutions to have a working EOLC policy
  • Providing a comprehensive care process that minimizes physical and non physical symptoms in the end of life phase and ensuring access to essential medications for pain and symptom control
  • Palliative care and EOLC to be part of all hospital and community/home based programs
  • Standards of palliative and EOLC as established by appropriate authorities and Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC) met and standards accredited and monitored by national and international accreditation bodies
  • All health care providers with direct patient contact are urged to undergo EOLC certification, and EOLC training should be incorporated into the curriculum of health care education.







[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article

Online since 1st October '05
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow