Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1--5

Pseudomonas bronchopulmonary infections in a palliative care setting


Department of Integrative Oncology, Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Health Care Global Enterprise, Bangalore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Naveen Salins
Department of Integrative Oncology, Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Health Care Global Enterprise, Bangalore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.97341

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Blood stream infections and pneumonia caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is associated with high mortality, especially in an immunocompromised host. A large section of the palliative care patient population has varied forms of compromised immunity due to advanced cancer or cancer treatment, organ failures, chronic autoimmune disorders, degenerative conditions, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The lung is one of the most frequently involved organs in a variety of complications in an immunocompromised host and infection is the most common complication. P. aeruginosa is one of the most common pathogens associated with bronchopulmonary infections in an immunocompromised host. Routine radiological tests like chest X-ray may often be unyielding and an early and a prompt initiation of treatment reduces mortality and morbidity risk.






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Online since 1st October '05
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