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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 312--316

The use of the Chuang«SQ»s prognostic scale to predict the survival of metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving palliative systemic anticancer therapy

Samy A Alsirafy1, Omar Zaki2, Amr Y Sakr2, Dina E Farag1, Wessam A El-Sherief1, Abha A Mohammed3 
1 Kasr Al Ainy Center of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Palliative Medicine Unit, Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Clinical Oncology, Kasr Al Ainy Center of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
3 Department of Clinical Oncology, Kasr Al Ainy Center of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; Al Amal Oncology Center, Aden, Yemen

Correspondence Address:
Samy A Alsirafy
Kasr Al Ainy Center of Clinical Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Palliative Medicine Unit, Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo
Egypt

Background: With the increasing number of agents active against cancer, advanced cancer patients including metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients may continue receiving palliative systemic anticancer therapy (PSAT) near the end-of-life. Validated palliative prognostic models, such as the Chuang«SQ»s prognostic scale (CPS), may be helpful in identifying mCRC patients with limited survival who are unlikely to benefit from PSAT. Aim: To test the ability of the CPS to predict the survival of mCRC under treatment with PSAT. Methods: CPS was prospectively assessed in 36 mCRC patients who were receiving PSAT. The scale is based on eight items: ascites, edema, cognitive impairment, liver and lung metastases, performance status, tiredness, and weight loss. The total CPS score ranges from 0 to 8.5 with the higher score indicating worse prognosis. Results: Patients were divided into two groups using a CPS cutoff score of 5, Group 1 with a CPS score ≤5 and Group 2 with a CPS score >5. Using this cutoff value, 3-month mortality was predicted with a positive predictive value of 71%, a negative predictive value of 77%, a sensitivity of 67%, a specificity of 81% and an overall accuracy of 75%. Group 1 patients had a longer median survival of 149 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 82-216) in comparison to Group 2 patients who had a median survival of 61 days (95% CI: 35-87). The difference in survival was statistically significant (P = 0.01). Conclusion: CPS may be useful in identifying mCRC patients with limited survival who are unlikely to benefit from PSAT.


How to cite this article:
Alsirafy SA, Zaki O, Sakr AY, Farag DE, El-Sherief WA, Mohammed AA. The use of the Chuang's prognostic scale to predict the survival of metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving palliative systemic anticancer therapy.Indian J Palliat Care 2016;22:312-316


How to cite this URL:
Alsirafy SA, Zaki O, Sakr AY, Farag DE, El-Sherief WA, Mohammed AA. The use of the Chuang's prognostic scale to predict the survival of metastatic colorectal cancer patients receiving palliative systemic anticancer therapy. Indian J Palliat Care [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Aug 23 ];22:312-316
Available from: http://www.jpalliativecare.com/article.asp?issn=0973-1075;year=2016;volume=22;issue=3;spage=312;epage=316;aulast=Alsirafy;type=0