Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 537--544

Does palliative sedation produce an ethical resolution to avoid the demand for euthanasia in a Muslim Country?


Center for Healthcare Ethics, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Ercan Avci
Center for Healthcare Ethics, 300 Fisher Hall, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJPC.IJPC_105_18

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One of the major purposes of palliative sedation is to reduce demand for euthanasia. The present paper analyzes a grievous case which demonstrates the killing of a 23-year-old son by his father due to the son's unbearable pain resulting from metastatic colorectal cancer. The article aimed to elaborate the case to figure out whether palliative sedation can be an alternative to euthanasia in a Muslim country. Nevertheless, the analysis of these two end-of-life issues revealed that the limitation of palliative sedation to an expected lifespan of less than 2 weeks as well as the Islamic view on the importance of protecting consciousness preclude reaching a conclusion that palliative sedation can be an alternative to euthanasia in this particular case. Furthermore, in such cases, the primary problem may be the lack of adequate and appropriate palliative care services, rather than the need for euthanasia or palliative sedation.






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Online since 1st October '05
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