Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 338--340

The philosophical and cultural situatedness of spirituality at the end of life in India


School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Dumfries DG1 4ZL, Scotland, UK

Correspondence Address:
Hamilton Inbadas
Glasgow End of Life Studies Group, The University of Glasgow, Dumfries Campus, Rutherford/McCowan Building, Crichton University Campus, Dumfries DG1 4ZL, Scotland
UK
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJPC.IJPC_61_17

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The sustained interest in exploring the spiritual domain at end of life in the Indian context reflects the recognition of its significance as an integral part of palliative care. A key aspect of findings from studies so far is the identification of challenges, inadequacies, limitations and ethical dilemmas in relation to spirituality at the end of life. India is known for its rich spiritual heritage and has unique ways of understanding, experiencing and expressing spirituality. The philosophical and cultural frames of reference, with which communities in India make sense of life, death and dying, determine the characteristics of Indian spirituality at the end of life. Exploring the concepts of the human person, the purpose of human life, the meaning of death and caring for the dying using Indian philosophical and cultural resources can help address some of the identified limitations and challenges in the Indian context. A cross-disciplinary approach, drawing together expertise from clinical palliative care, philosophy, theology and sociology, will enrich the understanding of spirituality at the end of life and can contribute to effective spiritual care in palliative care in specific contexts around the world.






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