Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 42--46

Clinical audit on documentation of anticipatory "Not for Resuscitation" orders in a tertiary australian teaching hospital


1 Consultant, Department of Integrative Oncology, HCG Enterprise Ltd-Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore, India
2 Mary Potter Nursing Research Fellow, Discipline of Nursing. The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Naveen Sulakshan Salins
Consultant, Department of Integrative Oncology, HCG Enterprise Ltd-Bangalore Institute of Oncology, Bangalore
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.78448

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Aim: The purpose of this clinical audit was to determine how accurately documentation of anticipatory Not for Resuscitation (NFR) orders takes place in a major metropolitan teaching hospital of Australia. Materials and Methods: Retrospective hospital-based study. Independent case reviewers using a questionnaire designed to study NFR documentation reviewed documentation of NFR in 88 case records. Results: Prognosis was documented in only 40% of cases and palliative care was offered to two-third of patients with documented NFR. There was no documentation of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) process or outcomes of CPR in most of the cases. Only in less than 50% of cases studied there was documented evidence to suggest that the reason for NFR documentation was consistent with patient's choices. Conclusion: Good discussion, unambiguous documentation and clinical supervision of NFR order ensure dignified and quality care to the dying.






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