Indian Journal of Palliative Care
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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 117--122

The dangers of involving children as family caregivers of palliative home-based-care to advanced HIV/AIDS patients


Department of Adult Education, Centre for Continuous Education, University of Botswana, P/B UB 00707, Gaborone, Botswana

Correspondence Address:
S M Kang'ethe
Department of Adult Education, Centre for Continuous Education, University of Botswana, P/B UB 00707, Gaborone
Botswana
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0973-1075.73641

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The aim of this research paper is to explore the dangers of involving children as family caregivers of palliative care and home-based-care to advanced HIV/AIDS patients, while its objective is to discuss the dangers or perfidiousness that minors especially the girl children face as they handle care giving of advanced HIV/AIDS patients. The article has relied on eclectic data sources. The research has foundminors disadvantaged by the following: being engulfed by fear and denied rights through care giving; being emotionally and physiologically overwhelmed; being oppressed and suppressed by caring duties; being at risk of contracting HIV/AIDS; and having their education compromised by care giving. The paper recommends: (1) strengthening and emphasizing on children's rights; (2) maintaining gender balance in care giving; (3) implementation and domestication of the United Nations conventions on the rights of children; (4) community awareness on equal gender co participation in care giving; (5) and fostering realization that relying on child care giving is a negative score in fulfilling global Millennium Development Goals.






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